Photo Booths And Photo Booth Hire – A Great Way To Record Any Special Occasion

Let’s face it, unless you come from one of the darkest corners of the earth, you will surely have seen photo booths countless times in your life. While they might not be as prevalent in public areas as they once were, you still see them nonetheless.

A decade or so ago, they were literally everywhere. You found them in train stations, shopping malls, and many places where you need to provide photos of yourself for things like passports, licenses, and so on. They offer a quick and efficient solution to anyone that is in urgent need of a few photos. These days, photo booths have become far more fun.

Many of the ones you find now offer a huge range of special effects. Have your face in the center of a heart, or maybe surrounded by flowers or even butterflies. Have yourself pictured with an elephant, a lion, or whatever other animal takes your fancy. Many booths are also able to print your picture, along with your chosen design onto stickers. It seems as though the range of options you have when you step into one of these booths just continues to increase all the time.

Now, just imagine how much fun a group of women could have at a hen party if there were one of these booths in the room. I’m not sure if they would be overly keen to share those photos with everybody, but they sure would have fun. A group of guys at a stag party would be no different either. The great news is, there are places that offer photo booth hire.

When you hire a photo booth from one of these companies, it takes nothing more than a simple phone call, and providing you live reasonably close, they will have it delivered and set up properly in time for the big event. The better type of booths are also capable of storing all the photos taken on a USB storage device, which means you have a solid backup should any of your prints get lost or damaged.

Photo booth hire is a great idea for adding life to any fun filled event, but there are however a few things which you need to consider. The most important one is the size of the booths being offered. Some are really small, and space will be tight even with only two people in it at a time. Ideally, you’ll want one that can comfortably accommodate at least six adults.

Alternatively, look for one that is able to open up, particularly if you like the idea of taking photos of larger groups. Again, this is very handy for stag parties and etc. Another thing to think about is the fact that it’s often necessary to book your booth well in advance in order to avoid disappointment. Lastly but not least, you should shop around a bit before you place your order because there invariably special deals to be had.

How Do You Photograph Butterflies?

As a longtime nature photographer, I’ve observed that people who are just beginning to take photographs of nature often face the same difficulties. To help you avoid frustration when you take nature photos, I would like to share some of my knowledge with you.

This article may be helpful to you, if you already have some basic knowledge about photography in general but have not yet tried to photograph butterflies. For the purposes of this article, I am going to assume that you are familiar with the terms F-stop, shutter speed, depth of field, focal length of lens, magnification, exposure, ISO sensitivity. If these are new terms for you – don’t worry. I will be writing about some of those basic terms in other articles that you can find on EzineArticles.com. If you read those, you’ll find the rest of this article much easier to follow.

Butterflies are fascinating, colorful creatures, which makes them so popular among any age group. Even people who are not necessarily involved in wildlife conservation seem to be attracted to these gorgeous insects.

So let’s assume that you have discovered a beautiful Swallowtail Butterfly in your backyard that you want to photograph. You have your camera ready. The Swallowtail is resting on a flower. There are two ideal positions that the butterfly can be in that will make it easier for you to get an excellent shot. I’m going to describe them and then give you a strategy for getting a great photo in each situation.

1. The butterfly has fully spread its wings.

Carefully approach the butterfly from above, avoiding any hasty movement or loud noise.

The sunlight is on your back – do not cast a shadow on the butterfly. This would most likely spook the butterfly and spoil the lighting on your subject. Once you are close enough that the Swallowtail’s wingspan fills the frame about halfway to three quarters of the way, you will need to adjust your camera and lens so that the back of your camera (or film or sensor plane) is aligned parallel to the wings’ top surface.

Misalignment may cause parts of the butterfly to be out of focus. The same happens if the butterfly lifts the wings up to a V. Then it becomes impossible to get the entire butterfly in focus.

Stopping down may improve the situation slightly, but the gain of depth of field becomes less the closer you are and the longer the focal length of the lens. With the available light, the shutter speed may drop too far and you will have to take measures to avoid blurring the picture. Using a tripod would be ideal, but it restricts mobility. A monopod would be a compromise. Use the vibration reduction feature, if available.

2. The butterfly has folded up the wings. This is a good opportunity to photograph the bottom side of the butterfly’s wings. The undersurface of the wings of some butterfly species, like the Swallowtail, reveals an attractive color pattern. The same applies for camera lens alignment as in the first example. The film or sensor plane must be parallel to the underside of the butterfly’s wing. This time you need to move in even closer than you did in the previous situation, because the wings are folded, leaving you with only half as much of the wing surface to photograph as you had in the previous example.

Here are two ways to improve your chances of getting that great butterfly photo you’re aiming for. As you’ve probably guessed, there’s a lot more to know about taking pictures of these beautiful but difficult models. I wish you the best of luck as you begin your new hobby; may it bring you much enjoyment!

Add Depth of Meaning to Your Photos by Adding Your Story!

When your family views your photo album 50 years from now, what will it mean to them? How about 75-100 years from now? Does it really matter?

We are creating a living legacy with each word we speak, each choice we make, and every action we take. It all pours into our DNA just as powerfully as eye color, hair texture, and physique. Our life stories are etched deeply in our memories but memories fade all too quickly if they are not recorded.

We are one generation away from oblivion unless we harness the power of our words and actions and put stories to our photos and other memorabilia.

This evening I wanted to snap a photo of the red cliffs in Thermopolis, Wyoming. The setting sun has cast a burnished glow to the towering mountain giants overlooking the Big Horn River. Interspersed with the red giants, overlapping velvety green hills sparkled in the fading sunlight… their sagebrush faces almost seemed as if they were made of jade.

Birds fluttered from tree to tree, their songs filling the wide blue expanse of heaven, bringing it right down to earth. A sole bald eagle soared gracefully from one end of the river to the other, it’s piercing eyes no doubt hoping for a great fish dinner.

It’s early April in the canyon and the naked trees rustle with last year’s brown leaves clinging bravely to bare branches. Next to the Big Horn River is the Fountain of Youth RV Park, home to the largest outdoor hot mineral pools. 1.4 million gallons of hot mineral water pour into a series of three large pools, cooling off as the water passes from one pool to the next.

Just after sunset the rushing fountain surges with a ruddy glow, it’s shooting plumes pulsate like fireworks while the last of the day’s puffy clouds part to reveal a midnight blue sky already sparkling with starry diamonds. On the weekends country music wafts through the night as children swim and play ball while parents float side-by-side in the misty water, heads close together, swaying slightly with the waves.

The water is thick with mineral content and the rich sodium makes my body pleasantly buoyant, almost as if there is zero gravity in the world. As my own weight diminishes, so the cares of the world melt off my soul and I feel lighter inside and out. My water bed is both pillow and blanket as swirls of mist curl around my face, enveloping me in a cloudy embrace. The air is cool and crisp but I’m as snug and warm as a little girl tucked into a feather bed.

I feel my Father tucking me into His embrace, and He reminds me that He is present all the time, everywhere.

Nature is a healer. She knows just what we need. Sixty percent of our North American population relies on some type of drug to control their dis-ease. Anxiety is at an all-time high and stress forms the roots of most infirmity. No one has prescribed anything for me and I don’t take any medications… yet I almost died from an illness that made its entrance soon after my husband’s body was healed.

As I soak and soak and soak today I can feel my body shedding the weight of stress and releasing toxic memories, words, and experiences. Extra baggage that can actually cause us to become over-weight as our bodies deal with the stress hormone, cortisol, storing it in our belly fat and other fat storage areas. Gross, huh?

As I watch the bald eagle I am reminded of my home in Northwestern Montana where seven bald eagles lived down the road from our house. A river rushed noisily in our front yard as beavers busily constructed dams while mountain lions stalked the beavers for their next dinner. Muskrats and otters filled the water with joyful leaps and dives. A bull frog chorus became the back up musicians for a butterfly choreography performed by thousands of fluttering blue and lavender beauties.

I miss home… my heart was only just beginning to mend in that haven of beauty and rest. Not many people understand the peculiar stress of being the sole caretaker of a severely injured husband. Days of anxiety and sleepless nights turned into years of never knowing if the pain was going to win and he would take his own life. Always watching, always on call. Missing my best friend who could no longer take walks with me, who no longer seemed himself. On drugs normally reserved for terminal cancer patients, something changed in our relationship…

Insurance ran out but it wouldn’t have paid for a caretaker’s care, anyway… who cares for the caretaker? There’s a season for everything. Winter is passing and a chubby robin hopping among the dandelions is a welcome harbinger of Spring. And so, in my own soul, Spring is here. I just needed a place to soak, a place to just “be”… a place that would remind me of home.

Caretakers need care too. When a family endures a severe illness the whole family suffers, but the one who cares 24/7 and is the closest often suffers things no one else sees or hears. They weigh on the soul and drain energy from the body. If you’re a caretaker you understand the demands, the risks, and the fatigue.

Maybe one day doctors will treat the caretaker as diligently as the injured patient, but in the meantime Creation is teaching me the hidden value of soaking in beauty and truth. Nature is healing the inner wounds only a long-term caretaker of one who was severely injured will understand.

A geothermal pool, burnished reddish-orange cliffs, a soaring bald eagle, a chubby robin, and dandelions… strong healing powers and my “medicine”.

Have you tested the power of Creation in healing your own soul? I’d love to hear your story!

This is part of my own story… a continuation of other stories:

“The Bionic Man Returns”

“Resistance, Eat My Dust!”

“Digging For Treasure in the Ruins of Accidents, Abuse, and Addictions”

“When It Hurts So Bad You Want to Die”

“5-Year Old Surfs the Airwaves”

“Mind Over Moose”

“The Horse Gourmet”

When writing you own life story, you can jump around. You don’t need to be concerned about chronological order, unless you want to. Everything can always be changed. The important thing is just to get started.

Pick a photo or two…. try to remember what made you snap that photo. What were you feeling at the time? Why is that place, that person, that event special to you?

What will your family lose if this memory is forgotten?

Don’t try to be perfect. Fumbling for words is natural. If you’re better talking than writing, have someone use a video camera or an audio recorder and follow our step-by-step blueprint in the “All-in-One” Life Story Book Kit for incorporating multimedia in your life story.

Recently I took a photograph of my mother holding her 70-year doll, and I listened to her heart along with her words as she described what made this doll so special for her. The photo turned out well (my mom is very photogenic) but without her story, it’s just a pretty photo!

Stories add a deeper layer of meaning when combined with photos!

I know you’re very busy and while you care about preserving your family’s heritage, you may not have all the time you wish you had to pull those photos and stories together!

You’ve been on my mind so much lately, and I don’t want you to miss out on creating a living family legacy and writing your life story!

So I thought, why not make this into a game? A game that can be played a few minutes each day or an hour each week… you can play by yourself or make it a party!

Let me know and I’ll send the “Life Story Game” to you today!

The Favorite Flowers of Bees and Butterflies

Flowers are one of the people’s favorite creations of God. They are widely used for different purposes. Flowers are the best weapons to melt someone’s heart. But don’t you know that bees and butterflies have their own favorite flowers, too? Do you want to know what their favorite flowers are? Read on.

For sure, you are pretty aware that bees and butterflies need flowers for pollination and for their own benefits. Furthermore, they also help in maintaining the balance in the ecosystem. Flowers are the number one reason why you are still enjoying the mouth-watering taste of honey from bees. Bees and butterflies have their favorite flowers. Yes, you read it right! Though they are naturally attracted to flowers and they are exposed to millions of flower species on this planet, they do have their favorite flower specie, too.

These are some of the most favorite flowers of bees and butterflies:

• Asters – These flowers will bloom during mid-summer and late fall. This flower is one of the latest blooming flowers in the northern climate. There are different colors of this flower. They come in dark purple, white and others call them dark blue. You can trim these flowers for several weeks on summer days. This will make their clump grow thicker. You can also let the flowers grow naturally to about 20 to 24 inches in length.

• Bee balm – It is one of the herb flowers that come in different colors, like red and deep purple. They bloom in mid-summer until early fall. Bee balms can be grown easily from seed, and they will grow in loose open clusters. Furthermore, bee balms are at their best if you will keep them away from mildew.

• Columbine – These flowers bloom in early spring; and they come in a variety of colors. Columbines have a lengthy tube-like flower top. Thus, bees will surely have their tough time. if you are afraid of bees and have a limited space, this flower is not suitable for you.

• Penstermon, Pink Chablis and Husker Red – This is one of the most favorite flowers of the female bees. They love to crawl inside the tubular blooms of this flower. You will only see their cute bee hinds, which will be left, exposed; while most of their bodies are inside the flower tube. These flowers are one of the native Mexican flowers. They bloom in early summer days and they can grow up to 8-36 inches in length.

• Butterfly weed – These flowers can easily attract the butterflies; and they bloom in summer season. They grow easily; and their seed can be invasive, if you do not pick their seed pods on the ground before they dry and burst open. Butterfly weeds come in different colors, like orange, yellow and red.

• White and purple cone flowers – These flowers are the honeybees’ all-time favorite flower. In fact, there are lots of photo evidences of bees while gathering these flowers. They bloom in early summer until early frost. However, they can stay longer with proper care and protection. These flowers will grow 24-40 inches in length.

• Blanket flowers or Gaillardias – These flowers, like any other flower, come in different colors. The yellows are called yellow goblins; while the reds are called Burgundy Gaillardia. They will give their best if they are exposed to full sunlight; and they grow up to 24 to 36 inches in length.

• Perennial Geranium – These flowers are known in Michigan as Cranesbill. They bloom in early summer and can survive until the fall season. They grow well in full sunlight or full shade to about 15-18 inches in length. These flowers come in different shades of purple and blue. They are one of the major sources of nectar for the wild bees.

• Sedum (Autumn Joy) – This flower blooms in late summer and will last in the early winter season. You will not be able to see these flowers during 60 degrees Fahrenheit in the last days of fall due to the swarm of bees in it. Bees crawl on each other just to get the nectar from it. Some of the bees will wait for their turn while staying on the leaves. Honeybees surely love these flowers.